036: The Earthen Womb


On December 8th, 2011, Scotland was hit by strong winds that, thanks to the zeal of Scotland’s population, was unofficially termed “Hurricane Bawbag.” Transport around the country halted, businesses closed for the day, buildings were torn up and electrical power was disrupted. The storm also uncovered a “room”, buried several feet under the surface of a garden in Anniesland, which the garden’s owner never realised was ever there.

Despite having no entrances whatsoever, the room bore signs of recent habitation.

The room was an almost-perfect hemispherical shape, dug into the soil by unknown hands. The floor was somewhat smoothed, and in several places, shapes reminescent of footprints can be seen – as well as patches of earth darkened by the spilled blood of a housecat, whose remains were found near the middle of the room, freshly-killed. On first glance,the room appears to have hundreds of tender roots reaching in through the dirt wall – on closer inspection, these roots are seen to be small, fleshy tendrils. The tendrils themselves seem stiff but flexible, and could be manipulated like a human finger. One particular set of tendrils, however, lay slack and lifeless against the wall of the room – when they were tugged at, a clod of earth collapsed out of the wall, revealing a dessicated crumple of withered flesh. Comparisons were instantly drawn with a human placenta.

The owner of the property, before moving out and putting the house on the market, mentioned that her garden always seemed to have more birds in it than the neighbours’ – and once saw a bird instantly disappear before her eyes in the garden, but rationalised and dismissed it. She also actively prevented her son playing in the garden, as he had told his mother on several occasions that someone in the garden had grabbed him while he was playing; his mother came to believe there was a pedophile in the neighbourhood.

The hidden room was filled in with soil after its owner decided to move house. In the two weeks that followed the aftermath of the storm, many homeowners in the area reported that the grass and soil in the gardens had been partially dug-up.

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